race

From radical black feminism to postfeminist hashtags: Re-claiming intersectionality

Attend me, hold me in your muscular flowering arms, protect me from throwing any part of myself away.

Audre Lorde (1986/2009: 132)

Intersectionality

The continued interest in intersectionality can be seen as a positive sign that feminist-inspired scholarship still has something significant to offer, and that its political dimension lives on. In management and organization studies, Intersectionality has been seized either as a theoretical lens or methodological approach in a number of literature strands, in both conceptual and empirical work. Yet, it would be too hasty to conclude that intersectionality is the answer to all ills, or the panacea that can replace the use of the ‘f-word’ altogether.

‘Health and ancestry start here’: Race and prosumption in direct-to-consumer genetic testing services

Introduction

But standing on the shores of what is known as the ‘Slave River’ near the Cape Coast of Ghana, where men and women were once bathed before they were sold into slavery, Mike felt a sense of peace instead of horror. ‘We had a ritual’, he said’ (Mike, 23andMe consumer).[1]

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