Anarchism

Autonomist leadership in leaderless movements: Anarchists leading the way

Introduction*

I receive and I give – such is human life. Each directs and is directed in his turn. Therefore there is no fixed and constant authority, but a continual exchange of mutual, temporary, and, above all, voluntary authority and subordination. (Bakunin, 2012/1882: 33)

Rethinking organizational hierarchy, management, and the nature of work with Peter Drucker and Colin Ward

Philosophical anarchism is a defensible position in theory. The only trouble with it is it never works. (Drucker, 2010: 40)

We have to build networks instead of pyramids. (Ward, 2008: 33)

The question of organization: A manifesto for alternatives

Introduction*

…anarchy is not the negation of organization but only of the governing function of the power of the State. (Dunois, 1907)

Anarchism and critical management studies: A reflection from an anarchist studies perspective

Riding the wave of nearly twenty years of global activism, anarchism has established a niche hold in a diverse range of research fields.  It would be a wild exaggeration to say that anarchism research has entered the mainstream, but hardly an embellishment to argue that the possibilities of the anarchist turn have been recognised by significant groups of scholars.  Richard J. White and Colin C.

Management, business, anarchism

Management, business, anarchism. Can these three terms, that come with so much baggage, be fruitfully brought together? This special issue brings together contributions that range from discussions of anarchist political economy and anarchism as a theory of organisation to the practices of anarchist alternatives and the radical imagination. Scholars from anarchist studies as well as critical management studies highlight the various ways the connections between the two fields can be articulated.

submission deadline  
1 Aug 2013
call for papers pdf  

Issue Editors: Konstantin Stoborod and Thomas Swann

While the inclusion of anarchism and management in the same sentence would normally connote a rejection of one and a corresponding defense of the other, the study of management and radical social and political thought are not as antithetical as one might at first imagine. The field of critical management studies, regularly dated back to the publication of Mats Alvesson and Hugh Willmott’s collection (1992), has drawn on left wing theoretical sources as well as heterodox empirical research in reflecting on and ultimately criticizing prevailing practices and discourses of management. As Gibson Burrell noted twenty years ago, there is a ‘growing number of alternative organisational forms now appearing, whether inspired by anarchism, syndicalism, the ecological movement, the co-operative movement, libertarian communism, self-help groups or, perhaps most importantly, by feminism’ (1992: 82). Despite anarchism appearing first in his list of inspirations for alternative organisation... more

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